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PROCESSING BSF LARVAE IN A SCREW PRESS:

Discussion in 'Tell good yarn..... have a giggle or two...' started by Bob Johnston, Dec 29, 2016.

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DOES ANYONE DO THIS?

  1. ONLY IN CALIFORNIA

    0 vote(s)
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  2. NO

    0 vote(s)
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  1. Bob Johnston

    Bob Johnston New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2016
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    Country:
    usa
    State:
    FLORIDA
    City:
    TAMPA
  2. Gratilla

    Gratilla Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2011
    Messages:
    405
    IMO I don't think this is funny, I think it is seriously interesting.

    BSF is something I've looked into and found them to be active in our area (south coast of West Java, Indonesia). They are particularly attracted to wet chicken feathers on hot days, on overcast days blowflies take over; also on wet chicken poop under battery cages of egg layers.

    As your pdf confirms pupae consist of chitin, protein and lipids (fats/oils), with the lipids being on the high side for an ideal animal/fish feed additive. That's why squeezing out the excess is interesting (and reportedly profitable). I also hear there is a market for chitin (in addition to the protein and lipids). If there were a recognisable market for these, I'd be able to to set up a medium sized farm pretty quickly.

    Any info on the commercial aspects of BSF products? (I see from you email address you're probably connected to Vincent Corp).
     
  3. Bob Johnston

    Bob Johnston New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2016
    Messages:
    2
    Country:
    usa
    State:
    FLORIDA
    City:
    TAMPA
    December 29, 2016
    Since you are in Indonesia, maybe my journal notes from a year ago (pasted below) will help. I wanted to have EAWAG do some work with a press from our rental fleet, but we could not put together the importation and return of the machine.
    Let me know if you make contact with them.
    Bob Johnston
    Senior Engineer
    Vincent Corporation
    Tampa, Florida USA

    October 28, 2015
    EAWAG, SUBARAYA, INDONESIA.
    Wakit Haryanto from Darmawan gave me a ride to this pilot facility. He stuck around until he had to leave for another appointment.

    Eawag is funded by the Swiss government. It is working with a local university to find uses for municipal waste. The facility is located next to a large municipal market, from which they take the produce waste. They shred the waste and store it in garbage pails. From there they try to do something with it. They tried composting, but it is too wet, and there is little value in compost.

    Their big thing is to grow black soldier flies in it. They have four long tables where the larvae grow. These are grown from eggs hatched in their nursery.

    They have tall translucent fabric cages full of black soldier flies where the flies lay eggs. The eggs are laid in the cracks between groups of sandwiched boards. They grown 500,000 flies a day.

    The larvae take 10 days to grow, but they let them go 14 days to fatten them up.

    They separate the larvae from the produce waste by drying the waste in the sun, and then separating by hand.

    They have not figured out what to do with the larvae yet. So they kill them by freezing them, and then they put them in a nearby cold storage locker. They talked of several things which could be done with them – like chicken or aquaculture feed – but they sure have not decided on any direction. They know the lipids will present a problem.

    I recommended that they rent a KP-6 and VS-8 shredder, plus a VS-18M sidehill. That would be to get some of the water out of the produce waste. They have three phase power available. They think the press liquor would work in a biogas digester which they could build…

    They have a need to reduce the moisture content of the produce waste. I explained why a screw press will not do that at all. They had tried blending in some dry material to bring down moisture. I showed them photos of layer manure which is quite dry and should work for them.

    Bart observed that bringing in rental machines would have the same problems and paperwork as when someone brings in machinery for a trade expo. Doing that without paying duty is always a challenge.

    I showed them where and how to put a discharge screen on their existing shredder. This would reduce the size of the pieces of melon.

    We spent four hours together. Bart Versappen, 011-62-31-582-033-48, c011-62-821-1228-9075, Belgian, probably a PhD, 40's, is in charge. His bosses in Switzerland rarely come to the site.

    Bram Dortmans, c011-62-812—3507-0480 or 011-31-648-844-925, Dutch, late 20's, may be doing an internship. He did his undergraduate in The Netherlands in Environmental Engineering and then took two masters' in environment and ecology in Sweden. Somehow he speaks good Malaysian, as well as English.
     

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